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Cannabis

Biochemistry

Cannabis contains more than 500 biochemical compounds. There are flavonoids, terpenes, phytocannabinoids, and proteins - all with potential therapeutic applications. Cannabidiol (CBD) is a non-psychoactive cannabinoid found in cannabis plant, that has been proven to have multiple benefits.

Endocannabinoid systems are a complex and integral part of every mammal's wellbeing. Cannabinoids are organic chemical compounds that work with other modulatory systems to interact with and activate certain receptors and regulate various systems in humans and other mammals such as appetite, mood, pain perception, memory and concentration.

Terpenes

Terpenes are organic chemical compounds we can find in almost any plant. They are responsible for the distinct flavor and smell of flowers and some fruits. There are even some animals that produce terpenes such as termites and some butterflies. They have important therapeutic uses and a fundamental role in promoting the "entourage effect" in conjunction with cannabinoids. Some terpenes help you relax, while others promote attention and alertness.

The cannabis plant contains more than 120 terpenes, and the most common are:

  • Myrcene, which increases cell permeability.
  • Limonene, which increases serotonin levels in our body.
  • Linalool, which has powerful sedative and relaxing effects.
  • Caryophyllene, which has anti-inflammatory properties.

Entourage effect

It has been shown since 1998 by scientists S. Ben-Shabat and Raphael Mechoulam that consuming various types of cannabinoids together with a variety of terpenes potentiate the beneficial effects due to the synergy generated by the compounds when interacting with each other. This interaction is known as the entourage effect, and it helps improve the absorption of cannabinoids, promotes the elimination of bacteria, and minimizes side effects.

SOMALAB products are made with only CO2 Extraction

CO2 Extraction preserves the cannabinoids and optimizes delivery to the Endocannabinoid system.

Other Extraction Processes

Biology & Anatomy

The human body has specific receptors (CB1 and AB2) to interact with cannabinoids. In fact, the human body, and mammals in general, produce their own cannabinoids, called endocannabinoids (like anandamide and 2-AG), to maintain a state of homeostasis. These substances are the key that activates the receptors we naturally have to regulate aspects such as appetite, mood, pain perception, memory and concentration.

The Endocannabinoid System (ECS)

The ECS is an active and complex cell interaction network composed of chemical neurotransmitters (the endocannabinoids) that bind to a large web of receptors (CB1 and CB2) distributed throughout the body, and then broken down by metabolic enzymes.

Currently, two types of cannabinoid receptors have been identified, the CB1 and CB2 receptors. They differ in the way they transmit signals and their distribution throughout the body.

Activation of cannabinoid receptors leads to inhibition of adenyl cyclase, which prevents the conversion of ATP to cyclic AMP (cAMP). Both CB1 and CB2 belong to the extensive family of G protein-coupled receptors.

CB1

The ECS is an active and complex cell interaction network composed of chemical neurotransmitters (the endocannabinoids) that bind to a large web of receptors (CB1 and CB2) distributed throughout the body, and then broken down by metabolic enzymes.

CB2

The ECS is an active and complex cell interaction network composed of chemical neurotransmitters (the endocannabinoids) that bind to a large web of receptors (CB1 and CB2) distributed throughout the body, and then broken down by metabolic enzymes.

CB1 + CB2

The ECS is an active and complex cell interaction network composed of chemical neurotransmitters (the endocannabinoids) that bind to a large web of receptors (CB1 and CB2) distributed throughout the body, and then broken down by metabolic enzymes.

Dosage

There are several important aspects to consider before consuming products with CBD. Cannabinoid treatments can have multiple benefits, but you need to know both the condition and the patient to recommend the most appropriate product. Some important aspects to consider are:

1

Patient height and weight

Always consult your physician before using CBD products.

2

The route of administration will matter depending on the condition and the patient's lifestyle and/or preference.

3

From less to more is always better. It is recommended to start with a low dose and regulate the amount consumed depending on how the patient feels.

History

Cannabis and humanity have had a close relationship since ancient times. There is evidence of its use since 10,000 BC in the Chinese culture, where its seeds were used as food, the leaves were used to cultivate the silkworm, from the fibers of the stem they made textiles, and thanks to the properties of the same stem they made bows like armament. The first record of the medicinal use of cannabis is attributed to Emperor Shennong in the 28th century BC.

An illustrative papyrus exists showing Hua T'o, a famous traditional Chinese surgeon, treating the wounds of the war hero Juan Kung. What is relevant about the portrayed event is that it is the first record of the use of anesthesia to treat wounds. The mixture used by the surgeon as a sedative contains boiled cannabis powder.

In the 5th century, the papermaking technique spread throughout Asia and then to the rest of Europe, where it was implemented in a common way for a couple more centuries.
In India, Kasajistan, and Nepal, they produced flours, food grains, and oils with very little acidity. Cannabis in India had mainly spiritual uses. Even today, it is sacred to Kali, the goddess of transmutation.

In the third century it was a basic material for making clothes, ropes and textiles in ancient Rome. In addition to its recreational use being socially accepted, it was recommended by the emperor's physician, Galen, to alleviate political tensions during meetings.


The spread of Christianity contributed to its decline in use, as it was considered a pagan herb. Pope Innocent VIII declared the use of cannabis sacrilegious, since only "witches" used it and it was considered a matter of the devil.


Until the 9th century, gradually leaving behind the Catholic obscurantism, the recreational use of hashish from Africa was resumed very discreetly in France.

A New World, a New Stage

During the discovery and colonization of America, hemp is gradually introduced. By 1620 on the English ship Mayflower, which transported the first Anglo-Saxon settlers, it is introduced even further. Many ships that later arrived with slaves were another way of introducing hemp to America. The independence constitution of the United States of America in 1976, was signed on hemp paper. The English rediscover cannabis in India and the French in North Africa, starting a commercial exploitation for naval materials such as sails and ropes.

Use in Modernity

In Europe during the 19th century, smoking hashish in a hooka was a well-regarded aspect among the intellectual guild. Théophile Gautier, Charles Baudelaire, Alexandre Dumas, Gérard de Nerval were some of the intellectual and cultural consumers of the time. Likewise, it is known that Queen Victoria of England consumed hashish jam to relieve the pain of menstruation.

At the end of the 19th century, migrant Indians brought cannabis to Mexico

and from there it spread throughout South America. Cannabis use was popular in suburban Louisville, primarily in African-American immigrant nightclubs.

In 1941, Japan bombs Pearl Harbor and the US enters the war.

He seeks to restock hemp, so he re-legalizes it as a war industry. “Hemp for victory” is filmed as war propaganda to produce.

In 1947, India became independent from Great Britain

and exported hemp to various countries.

Postwar France is revolutionized industrially.

It is still cultivated, unlike in the US, but synthetic fibers become very popular and natural fibers are overtaken by synthetic textiles.

Years 60, social movements "hippies" asking to legalize.

The young and relaxed culture embraces "weed". They went to Morocco because there was kief everywhere, it grew like weeds in any garden.

Jamaica 70's. Bargain.

It is religious tradition to communicate with your god.

Amsterdam in the 1970s

cannabis is legalized and "coffee shops" serving cannabis become a common business. Cannabis tourism in Amsterdam is a huge industry to this day.

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